ʻAkiapolaʻau

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ʻAkiapōlāʻau

Conservation status

Endangered (IUCN 3.1)[1]

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Animalia

Phylum:
Chordata

Class:
Aves

Order:
Passeriformes

Suborder:
Passeri

Family:
Fringillidae

Subfamily:
Carduelinae

Tribe:
Hemignathini

Genus:
Hemignathus

Species:
H. wilsoni

Binomial name

Hemignathus wilsoni
(Rothschild, 1893)

Synonyms

Hemignathus munroi (Pratt, 1979)

The ʻakiapōlāʻau (Hemignathus wilsoni), pronounced ah-kee-ah-POH-LAH-OW, is a species of Hawaiian honeycreeper, that is endemic to the island of Hawaii. Its natural habitats are dry and montane moist forests, and the only bird species on the island to occupy the woodpecker niche.[2] The bird is 5.5 inches (14 cm) in length, and has an unusually curved beak-(a specialist species). The ʻakiapolaʻau is a pudgy bird which has a whitish bottom and tail, black legs, yellow chest, orangish head, black face mask and bill and gray black wings. The male’s song is either a loud, short pit-er-ieu or a rapid warba-warba.[3] Its various calls include an upslurred whistle, a short cheedle-ee warble, and a short sweet.[2]

Contents

1 Distribution
2 Diet
3 Breeding
4 Conservation and threats
5 See also
6 References
7 External links

Distribution[edit]
The ʻakiapōlāʻau occurs mainly in old-growth mesic and wet forests in Kaʻū and Hamakua. Koa (Acacia koa) and ʻōhiʻa lehua (Metrosideros polymorpha) are dominant canopy species in its habitat. Disease-carrying mosquitoes have restricted it to elevations of between 1,300 and 2,100 metres (4,300 and 6,900 ft). It formerly inhabited māmane (Sophora chrysophylla) -naio (Myoporum sandwicense) dry forests at elevations of 1,900 to 2,900 metres (6,200 to 9,500 ft) on Mauna Kea, but this population was extirpated in 2002.[2]
Diet[edit]
It feeds on insects which are found hidden within the branches of the trees. It also feeds on the nectar of flowers shaped like its bill. It also looks for invertebrates at the floor of the forest where there is a large amount of natural growth. This bird uses its long bill to peck open the bark to reach the larvae; it then uses its thin upper bill to probe out the meal and its lower bill to cru


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